Last edited by Arashijind
Monday, November 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Food plants of British Columbia Indians found in the catalog.

Food plants of British Columbia Indians

Nancy J. Turner

Food plants of British Columbia Indians

  • 210 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by British Columbia Provincial Museum in Victoria .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians, North American.,
  • Ethnobotany.,
  • Plants, Edible -- Canada.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Nancy J. Turner.
    SeriesHandbook - British Columbia Provincial Museum ; no. 34, Handbook (British Columbia Provincial Museum) -- no. 34, etc.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17840638M
    LC Control Number97320465

    The Indian History of British Columbia, Volume 1 Issue 5 of Anthropology in British Columbia, British Columbia Provincial Museum of Natural History and Anthropology, ISSN The Indian History of British Columbia, British Columbia Provincial Museum: Authors: Wilson Duff, British Columbia Provincial Museum: Publisher. The Nuu-chah-nulth (/ n uː ˈ tʃ ɑː n ʊ l θ /; Nuučaan̓uł: [nuːt͡ʃaːnˀuɬʔatħ]), also formerly referred to as the Nootka, Nutka, Aht, Nuuchahnulth or Tahkaht, are one of the indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast in term Nuu-chah-nulth is used to describe fifteen related tribes whose traditional home is on the west coast of Vancouver Island.


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Food plants of British Columbia Indians by Nancy J. Turner Download PDF EPUB FB2

An account of the edible wild plants used by the Interior Native Americans of British Columbia as well as some of their history and culture. It covers some general harvesting, preparation, seasonal plant use and detailed accounts of specific plants which have a brief Food plants of British Columbia Indians book, habitat, 5/5(2).

FOOD PLANTS OF THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS Br ELIAS TANOTSKY ClMinlsl rbohrdr«!« This publication is a summary of the records of food plants used by the Indians of the United States and Canada which have appeared m Cambium used by Indians of British Columbia.

Teit {69, p. Food plants of British Columbia Indians. Victoria: British Columbia Provincial Museum, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Nancy J Turner.

Food plants of British Columbia Indians. [Nancy J Turner] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or Search WorldCat. Find items in libraries near you.

This book is an account of the edible wild plants used by the Coastal Native Americans of British Columbia as well as some of their history and culture. It covers some general harvesting, preparation, seasonal plant use and detailed accounts of specific plants which have a brief description, habitat, distribution in B.C., and "Indian" use.5/5(2).

food and medicinal plants used by the indians of british columbia * J. MacDermot * Read at the Seventy-ninth Annual Meeting of the Canadian Medical Association, Section of Historical Medicine, Toronto, J Cited by: 1.

Native plants of B.C. largely contributed to the diets of First Nations peoples of this area before these people and their land were colonized.

Seaweed. Seaweed has been an important plant for many First Nations peoples of British Columbia. Along the coast, families still travel out to seaweed beds that have provided food for thousands of years.

Nancy J. Turner, "Food Plants Of Coastal First Peoples" and "Food Plants of Interior First Peoples" I'll give it 5 stars for ethnobotany and 4 stars as a foraging book.

If you live in the pacific northwest these books are MUST HAVES. A thorough grouping of the plants used by native americans for food in the pacific northwest/5(14). Calling all the foodies out there, find & book the top-rated and best-reviewed food tours on Tripadvisor today.

Eat your way through the food scene of British Columbia. Your tastebuds will be thanking you later. Book effortlessly online with Tripadvisor.

peoples of British Columbia and western Washington. Fruits were an important food source for Native Americans and are still collected today. The berries are among the first to ripen, and are a beautiful salmon color that stand out in the generally rainy weather.

Food plant of British Columbia Indians. Part II. Interior peoples. British Columbia Provincial Museum Handbook No. 36, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Turner, N.J. Food plants of British Columbia Indians.

Part I. Coastal Peoples. British ColumbiaFile Size: KB. eaten by coastal peoples of British Columbia and western Washington.

Fruits were an important food source for Native Americans and are still collected today. The berries are among the first to ripen, and are a beautiful salmon color that stand out in the generally rainy weather of spring.

Large quantities ofFile Size: 81KB. Plant Technology of First Peoples in British Columbia Food Plants of British Columbia Indians-Coastal Peoples Food Plants of British Columbia Indians-Interior Peoples. Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast – Pojar, Mackinnon (See our store on to order) Northwestern Wild Berries – J.E.

Underhill. ISBN This is a list of plants used by the indigenous people of North America. For lists pertaining specifically to the Cherokee, Navajo, and Zuni, see Cherokee ethnobotany, Navajo ethnobotany, and Zuni ethnobotany.

This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Abronia fragrans (snowball-sand verbena) Used as both food and medicine. Books Our Botanists Use Pacific Northwest. A Manual of the Higher Plants of Oregon.

Peck, Morton E. Food plants of interior First Peoples. Turner, N. UBC Press, Vancouver, British Columbia. Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest. Ray Coupe, Dennis Lloyd, Roberta Parish. Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples, along with its companion on interior peoples, has two purposes, as the author states in her introduction: “first, to inform interested naturalists and outdoors enthusiasts of the wealth and diversity of wild edible plants to be found in the privince; and second, for.

FOOD PLANTS OF THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS By ELIAS YANOVSKY, chemist, Carbohydrate Resea'rch Division, Bureau of Chemistry and Soils CONTENTS FOREWORD This publication is a summary of the records of food plants used by the Indians of the United States and Canada which have appeared in ethnobotanical publications during a period of nearly Journalof ETHNO- PHARMACOLOGY Journal of Ethnopharmacology 49 () Antiviral screening of British Columbian medicinal plants A.R.

McCutcheon*a, T.E. Roberts b, E. Gibbonsb, S.M. Elfsa, L.A. Babiukb, R.E.W. Hancock`, G.H.N. Towers' 'Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, # University Blvd., Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T IZ4 bVeterinary Cited by: Book Reviews Turner, Nancy J.: Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples (Royal British Columbia Museum Handbook).

Vancouver: UBC Press,(Second edition of Food Plants of British Columbia Indians. Part 1. Coastal Peoples. ISBN PaperCON $ Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples is an expanded and updated. Can Med Assoc J. Aug;61(2) Food and medicinal plants used by the Indians of British Columbia.

MacDERMOT JH. PMCID: PMCCited by: 1. A focus on the plants that provided heat, shelter, transportation, clothing, implements, nets, ropes for the first peoples in British Columbia.

Revised Author: Jeff Purdue. Ravenhill, Alice, Native Tribes of British Columbia. Ruddell, Nancy, Jennifer Wilson (ed), Jennifer Rae-Brown (ed), Raven's Village: The Myths, Arts and Traditions of Native People from the Pacific Northwest Coast.

Canadian Museum of Civilization, Smith, Harlan I., Ethnobotany of the Gitksan Indians of British Columbia. Univ. Ethnobotany of the Okanagan-Colville Indians of British Columbia and Washington Nancy J.

Turner, Randy Bouchard, Dorothy I. Kennedy British Columbia Provincial Museum, - Ethnobotany - 4/5(1). Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources and usage of plants by the Thompson Indians of British Columbia.

Royal British Columbia Museum Memoirs No. 3, Victoria. Turner, N.J., J. Thomas, B.F. Carlson, & R.T. Food plants of British Columbia Indians. Part I. Coastal peoples. B.C. Provincial Museum File Size: 78KB.

Full text of "Food plants of the North American Indians" See other formats. Thompson ethnobotany: knowledge and usage of plants by the Thompson Indians of British Columbia. Nancy J. Turner and others. Victoria, Royal British Columbia Museum, p.

(Royal British Columbia Museum. Memoir, no. 3) Includes bibliographical references. EN96T39. The resulting fruit was much larger and the plants more productive than either of the parents, and it retained the excellent flavour of both parents. BC Studies book reviews related to food history.

Saskatoons – true Western Canada fruit. One Response to Strawberries Native to British Columbia. nicolas grasslin J at pm. This volume details the nutritional properties, botanical characteristics and ethnic uses of traditional food plants of indigenous Canadian Peoples.

It contains an index of over one thousand plants from all provinces of Canada, as well as the bordering states, for which the Indian and Inuit peoples of each regfion have been consulted as the definitive source concerning plant usage within the.

When we deal with Ojibway Indians of British Columbia, we must first focus on the Hudson Hope Band and the Shuswap including the Chilcotin. The Ojibway Indians of British Columbia, who are better known as the Saulteau or Saulteaux, are actually an admixture of native Chippewa Indians and those who later followed prophecy and migrated to northern British Columbia from the southeast.

Christopher Columbus's "discovery" of the Americas in led to the introduction of many novel crops to Europe and subsequently to European colonies in Asia and Africa, forever changing the global food gh it was the European explorers and colonizers who transported foods from the New World to the Old, the native peoples who domesticated these plants over millennia have.

Unfortunately, in his opining speech over the radio, a very prominent official of the British Columbia Government made a bad slip, thus offending all the Indians present who understood English.

After a few preliminary remarks, this personage went on: "Of course, the. Wild Edible Plants of British Columbia This guide covers a number of edible plants in British Columbia, Canada including the Vancouver area, the Gulf Islands, Haida Gwaii, and the Kootenay, Yoho, Mount Revelstoke, and Glacier National Parks.

Autecology of common plants in British Columbia: A literature review. British Columbia Ministry of Forests. Harbinger, L. The importance of food plants in the maintenance of Nez Perce cultural identity. Master of Arts in Anthropology. Washington State University, Pullman, Washington.

73 pp. Hickman, J. (ed.) The Jepson. The pretty, flower-filled capital of British Columbia, Victoria, situated at the southern tip of Vancouver Island, boasts a beautiful harbor, museums galore, plus—the focus of this EYW snapshot—abundant local seafood and a surprising number of very good microbrews.

Ethnobotany and Ethnoecology Books Nancy Turner’s Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples, Food Plants of Interior First Peoples, and Plant Technologies of First Peoples in British Columbia provide an unsurpassed collection of ethnobotanical texts for British Columbia that have a great deal of relevance to foraging in the Pacific Northwest.

During the s Harlan I. Smith, an archaeologist with the National Museums of Canada, documented plant and animal knowledge and use among the Gitksan, Nuxalk and Ulkatcho Carrier of British Columbia. Smith’s work is the earliest, relatively comprehensive ethnobotanical study for Cited by: 8.

Food and Culture Among Bolivian Aymara: Symbolic Expressions of Social Relations (ACTA Universitatis Upsaliensis) George Erdosh Food and Recipes of the Revolutionary War (Cooking Throughout American History) Nancy J. Turner Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples.

Thompson ethnobotany: knowledge and usage of plants by the Thompson Indians of British Columbia Contributors: Turner, Nancy J.,Book, pages. Food plants of coastal First Peoples. book by Nancy J. Turner. book edited by edited by Douglas Deur and Nancy J. Turner. Plant technology of First Peoples in British Columbia.

book by Nancy J. Turner. Traditional plant foods of. BC Food History Network. BC Food History Network was started about by three home economists. We research the history of food production and consumption in BC, Canada, and wherever else we find connections to food and history.

We hope you will enjoy this site as much as we have enjoyed our food history research. Kwakiutl, self-name Kwakwaka’wakw, North American Indians who traditionally lived in what is now British Columbia, Canada, along the shores of the waterways between Vancouver Island and the mainland.

Their name for themselves means “those who speak Kwakwala.” Although the name Kwakiutl is often applied to all the peoples of that group, it is the name of only one band of Kwakwaka’wakw.Book Hotels.

British Columbia Food & Drink in British Columbia Western Canada is home to an excellent and evolving regional cuisine that relies on local produce, farm-raised game, grass-fed beef and lamb, and fresh-caught fish and shellfish. These high-quality ingredients are matched with inventive sauces and accompaniments, often based on.Title Kwakiutl and Nootka Indian tribes of British Columbia Summary Summary: A-Kwakiutl: Portraits of men (including a chief and a warrior) and women (including a chief's daughter), many wearing ceremonial clothing and nose rings, many identified; ceremonial dancers (including Winter Dance participants), some holding skulls and skeleton parts, wearing masks, wigs, fur, feathers, and.